Observer Analyzer : Observer Analyzer : GigaStor Control Panel : Getting started using your GigaStor : Differences between GigaStor Software Edition and GigaStor
Differences between GigaStor Software Edition and GigaStor
The GigaStor Software Edition (GSE) is identical in most ways to a hardware GigaStor purchased from VIAVI. However, there are differences that exist due to GSE naturally lacking GigaStor hardware components like the capture card and high-performance RAID card(s).
 
Capability
GigaStor Software Edition
GigaStor as Appliance
Mining & Analysis Interface
X
X
Packet Capture
X
X
Real-Time Statistics
X
X
Trending
X
X
Triggers and Alarms
X
X
Data-at-Rest Security
X
Capture card
X
Hardware Acceleration
X
Hardware Filtering
X
Packet Deduplication
X
Physical Port Indexing
X
Precision Time Stamping
X
Virtual Adapters
X
High-performance RAID card
X
 
Minimum and recommended system specifications
If you are installing the software on your own hardware or a virtual machine, these are the minimum and recommended specifications for a production environment.
 
Table 33. Observer Expert Console Only (ECO)
Minimum
Recommended
Processor / CPU
Dual core Pentium class processor
Quad core Pentium class processor
RAM1
2 GB RAM
8 GB RAM
Operating system2
64-bit Operating System
Windows 7 to Windows Server 2012 R2
64-bit Operating System
Windows 7 to Windows Server 2012 R2
Network Card
Server-class
Intel server-class

1 If your system has 4 GB of RAM, you cannot reserve any memory for Observer. This is a limitation of Windows known as the BIOS memory hole. Either add more RAM or take some out.

2 See Supported Operating Systems for a full list of supported operating systems.

 
 
Table 34. Observer or GigaStor Software Edition in a virtual server
Minimum
Recommended
Processor / CPU
Four core
Six core Intel
RAM1
Minimum 16 GB (8 GB for Observer and 8 GB for the operating system)
64 GB
Storage
Packet capture - Hardware: Determined by your product
Packet capture - GigaStor Software Edition: Determined by your license.
Same
Operating system2
64-bit Operating System
Windows 7 to Windows Server 2012 R2
64-bit Operating System
Windows 7 to Windows Server 2012 R2
Network Card
Virtualized network adapter
Intel server-class
Capture Card3
Virtualized network adapter
Server-class onboard network adapter

1 If your system has 4 GB of RAM, you cannot reserve any memory for Observer. This is a limitation of Windows known as the BIOS memory hole. Either add more RAM or take some out.

2 See Supported Operating Systems for a full list of supported operating systems.

3 A second network card that acts solely as a capture card is required (and must be in “promiscuous mode”). Alternatively, a dual-port NIC can be used. For further details, see Capture card driver requirements.

 
 
 
 
Current compatibility and incompatibly of virtual machines with the GigaStor Software Edition (GSE) is described in this list:
VMWare ESXi Server
ESXi 5.0 and higher is compatible with GSE.
VMWare Workstation Pro is not supported with GSE
Microsoft Hyper-V may function but is not supported with GSE
 
Storage limits of packet capture for GigaStor Software Edition (GSE)
The disk storage capacity usable for packet capture and of GigaStor Software Edition (GSE) is governed by your GSE license. This allows flexible cost options when considering the storage available to the computer, or virtual machine, that you are installing GSE on.
 
GSE licenses are available at these maximum storage sizes:
 
256 GB
1 TB
4 TB
16 TB
32 TB
48 TB
64 TB
 
 
 
Maximum storage size is a measure of how much network data (in the form of packets) can be retained by the GigaStor Software Edition before the oldest GigaStor data is removed in a first-in first-out (FIFO) storage scheme. The maximum storage size is not an indication of how much disk space the GigaStor Software Edition will consume on your hard disk. For example, the program files and libraries, storage of network trending data (not packets), and other executables are not governed by your GSE license and do not count towards the maximum storage capacity.
Network trending storage is a separate issue from packet capture storage and they are not connected in any way except both require writing data to the hard drive. When estimating file size, retention, and system maintenance, you may want to look at the system holistically and consider both simultaneously. Read more about network trending in Configuring your network trending settings.
 
How to determine disk space requirements for network trending
Because network trending can consume a lot of disk space, you need to know how much disk space to reserve.
Network trending data consumes hard disk space. Depending on where you store trending data and your storage requirements for network trending data, the network trending data could fill that drive to full capacity—this is a problem. Therefore, determine your typical 24-hour data rate and how many days of trending data you want to retain. The result indicates how much storage space is required.
To determine the amount of space required to store your desired amount of trending data:
1. Determine your typical 24-hour data rate.
Example: 15 MB or 20 GB.
The data rate is amount of trending data collected in one 24-hour period.
2. Multiply your typical 24-hour data rate by the number of days you want to retain.
Example: 15 MB x 365 days = 5.475 GB
Example: 20 GB x 30 days = 600 GB
 
The result is the amount of hard drive space required to retain the trending data.
 
 
You can use the numbers you calculated to inform your decisions when deleting network trending data.